Convention Center ‘MASH’ Unit Closing, But Health Chief Warns COVID Dangers Remain

first_img CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Business News 23 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it HerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Woman Being Deceptive About Her Age Is Nothing New!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Convention Center ‘MASH’ Unit Closing, But Health Chief Warns COVID Dangers Remain By KEVIN KENNEY, SENIOR REPORTER Published on Friday, June 12, 2020 | 3:30 am Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Photo by James CarboneAs many businesses in Pasadena and L.A. County prepare to reopen with Friday’s easing of Stay at Home orders, one sign of optimism regarding possible pandemic progress might be what won’t reopen – or, in this case, won’t open in the first place.The 250-bed alternate-care facility that was set up in April at the Pasadena Convention Center – a safeguard in case the number of COVID-19 patients overwhelmed Huntington Hospital – is being officially decommissioned at the end of the month, city officials confirmed.To everyone’s relief, the MASH-like set-up was never needed and never used, as Huntington was able to handle the number of COVID patients who required hospitalization.However, health officials, including Dr. Ying-Ying Goh, Pasadena’s director of public health, reiterated this week that with increased interaction from reopened businesses comes increased risk of a spike in COVID cases — a scenario that has already begun to register in L.A. County, where health officials on Thursday reported 1,857 new coronavirus cases and 46 additional COVID-related deaths.While it was the largest single-day number of new cases announced by the county during the pandemic, health officials said that roughly 600 of those cases were the result of a backlog in the reporting of test results. Pasadena and Long Beach, with their own health departments, combined to confirm an additional 84 cases on Thursday.Such numbers have prompted continued warnings from health officials such as Goh that, while businesses are reopening, the threat of COVID-19 has not passed and a surge remains possible.“Over the past two weeks, the city has been able to make significant efforts toward reopening our economy in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic as a state order has been modified to loosen restrictions, allowing certain sectors to open. We have been able to do so locally based on our local epidemiology,’’ Goh told the City Council this week.“It has become clear, from our community, our City Council and our state and county leadership that it is no longer an option for all of us to remain safer at home to the extent that we were able to do for a time. … (But) we continue to ask everyone to stay safer at home to the extent they can, especially those at greater risk.’’Goh also stressed that, “We should expect now, that if more people are interacting, there will be an increase in the kinds of interactions that allow the virus to spread, despite our best efforts to engineer protocols to prevent this. With more person-to-person interaction, it is likely we’ll see an increase in cases throughout our community in all settings.’’According to Goh, health officials will closely monitor data in the coming days and weeks, wary of a possible surge that still could challenge the capacity of local hospitals.Indeed, when asked by Council Member Andy Wilson on Monday if she were comfortable with the current configuration of the hospital beds in case of second wave of coronavirus, Goh replied, “No, I can’t really say that at all. I think that we will have to follow the data closely and be prepared to surge again if needed.’’“I think that we do want to have the surge capacity,’’ she added, “but the level of beds at the Convention Center was for very low-level care, and we, since that time, have seen the hospital expand their capacity on site with better-equipped spaces…“I feel that those beds that are there (at the hospital) will better serve higher acuity patients and the people who would likely need it. That helps to moderate the loss of the cots, really, that were at the Convention Center.’’As of this week, according to Goh, there were fewer than 20 COVID patients being treated at Huntington Hospital.The spillover facility at the Convention Center was approved by the council in April following a city staff report that said “projections provided by Huntington Memorial Hospital indicate that at (the outbreak’s) peak, currently estimated for mid-May, there could be as many as 1,300 persons requiring hospitalization at its facility for treatment of COVID-19. … Such a peak would exceed that capacity by approximately 400 beds.’’But those numbers did not materialize, leading to the decision to decommission the makeshift facility.“Based on the data, COVID-19 projections and consultation with local and state health officials at the time, our City Council recognized the importance of having surge capacity in place in coordination with Huntington Hospital,” City Manager Steve Mermell told Pasadena Now on Sunday. “No patients were placed there, although we had a plan in place should there have been a need. With all the mass gatherings and reopening we hope we don’t get a large influx of cases in the next few weeks.”City staff estimated the initial cost of establishing the temporary medical facility at about $250,000 for the first month and $180,000 for each month thereafter.Meanwhile, Goh told the council that a second wave of COVID cases is not a matter of if, but of when – and, more important, of how severe.“We’re trying to model out when we would expect another wave,’’ she said. “I don’t think that the possibility of not having one is on the table. I think that there will be, and possibly in the fall.’’City News Service contributed to this report. Subscribecenter_img STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Top of the News Community News More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. 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Rental Demand is Surging in Record Numbers

first_img Tagged with: Baby Boomers Generation X Millennials Rental Housing Subscribe The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Rental Demand is Surging in Record Numbers in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Baby Boomers Generation X Millennials Rental Housing 2015-12-12 Brian Honea Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Rental Demand is Surging in Record Numbers  Print This Post Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily The last decade has seen an unprecedented demand for rental housing, driven largely by the bursting of the housing bubble and demographic shifts, according to a report from The Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University released this week.The percentage of U.S. households that rent rose from 31 percent in 2005 up to 37 percent by mid-2015, the highest level of renters in five decades. The 10-year period from 2005 to 2015 saw the number of renters nationwide increase by 9 million up to 43 million by mid-2015, the largest gain in renters for any 10-year period on record.A large driver of the unprecedented increase in rental housing has been the bursting of the housing bubble in 2008. Nearly 8 million families have lost their homes to foreclosure since the homeownership rate peaked in 2004. Household incomes have returned to their mid-90s levels and mortgage credit access has become tighter.“The sharp downturn in both the economy and housing market has renewed appreciation of the benefits that renting offers,” the report states, citing lower moving costs for renters tan for owners that enable them to more easily respond to changes in employment or the housing market; less financial risk to renters than to owners who have a significant share of wealth tied up in a single investment that is subject to dramatic swings in value; and renters want to be relieved of responsibility (and expense) for property maintenance that comes with owning.The growing popularity in rental housing demand is also due to the aging of the millennial generation (defined in the report as born between 1985 and 2004) which has created a larger number of adults in their 20s—which has traditionally been the most common age for renting. Millennials are also delaying until a later age life events that typically precede first-time homeownership, such as marriage and having children. According to the report, the number of renters nationwide would be even higher on top of the 9 million increase over the last decade if the recession “had not kept many young adults living in their parents’ homes.” One million of those 9 million renters gained in the last decade were under age 30. Generation X (born between 1965 and 2004) accounted for one-third, or 3 million, of that 9 million increase. The largest share, perhaps surprisingly, went to baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1965) at 4.3 million, accounting for almost half of the 9 million increase in renters over the last decade.The growth not only reflects the aging of the baby boomer rental generation, but the decline in homeownership rates among that demographic, according to the report. While households in their 20s make up the largest share, the majority of all renters nationwide are age 40 or older. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago About Author: Brian Honea The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago December 12, 2015 1,171 Views Previous: Forces Join to Protect Borrowers from Foreclosure Relief Scams Next: DS News Webcast: Monday 12/14/2015 Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agolast_img read more